RIP Greg

Reading a biography of Elon Musk a few years back, I kept thinking about my school mate, Greg. He passed away 8 years ago. I wish Greg had been an Elon Musk. He studied engineering and computing so that he could design and build a military space fleet, but didn’t quite get there in this […]

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A meagre homage

JG Ballard died in 2009 on April 19 (I am a tad late to say ‘OTD’). I read his “The Voices of Time” in a paperback collection edited by Damien Knight, 100 Years of Science Fiction. (I was very happy to buy those two volumes, by the way, in the mid-70s, with part of the […]

The Luge! The Luge!

For your Winter Olympics reading pleasure in the short breaks between episodes of The Curling (not a Laird Barron novel), why not read my story with a title that threatens to break the Twitter character limit, “The murder of Father Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin considered as the single men’s Olympics Luge final“? A story that manages […]

Australia Day

When I was a young man, I saw a part of a US made for TV movie about an Australian serial killer going about his hobby in the US. Apparently it was based on a true story. The killer had some form of American accent – indeed, was played by an American, and that was […]

Dave’s New year Meditations

Hey yoose lot, happy new year, and get some meditations into ya. Ideas are far more powerful than guns. We don’t allow our enemies to have guns, why should we allow them to have ideas? – Joseph Stalin Until a man is twenty-five, he still thinks, every so often, that under the right circumstances he […]

Story #26 – “The Time-Traveller’s lament”

May I recommend for your reading … pleasure? … my most recent publication, and my final for 2021 (and who knows, perhaps my final ever?), The Time-Traveller’s Lament ? So many things to say about this, for a change. Thanks to the folks at Sci-Phi Journal. This is the second story of mine they have […]

The Ministry for the Future

Kim Stanley Robinson’s The Ministry for the Future was published in 2020 and is well-reviewed and has no doubt sold very well, so there is no call for a further review, which is fortunate as I do not know how to review books and so do not do so. All I can do, with absolute […]

Testostero

The opening of the first paragraph of Testostero by David Foster may be the most Australian thing* I have ever read, and it is not even set here: The most astounding feature of Venice to Noel Horniman, who at age forty is seeing it for the first time, is not the architecture – which seems […]