David Stevens

Posts Tagged ‘Australian writing’

Grappling with 2017

In Uncategorized on January 8, 2017 at 11:08 am

The coming soon is coming sooner. Long awaited, the second volume of the Grapple Annual is, I hear, coming this way. If not just around the corner, then surely it is just down the street and couple of blocks to the left. Some rough beast, its hour come round at last, slouches towards Canberra to be born. Should we be bewaring the ides of March? Or April? Or even February? Dunno. But I hear that it is coming.

Sergeant Burns is a character that/who has been living inside my head for a long time. He had a little peek out of my third eye hole a few years ago, courtesy of my self-trephination (there are some who say the pineal gland is not meant to see the light of day. Who says it doesn’t already? I just wanted to let some air in. Are these the same few who would restrict surgery for the elite, and deny it to the masses? I speak of the performance thereof. But now is not the time to discuss Amateur surgery. I capitalise Amateur in the spirit of the Olympics. But I digress. And where would the fun be in life if we didn’t?), in his initial public appearance a few years ago in the first Grapple Annual, which published his Penultimate Report. And now he wakes me from my sleep, demanding I record his final adventures. Another character, little harmless (I think there is a spelling mistake there somewhere) MacGuffin, spends a few moments in the daylight in the second Grapple, before being replaced in his cupboard, or setting off to interstellar darkness, or both, or perhaps I just can’t remember which.

The Golden Age of Science Fiction, celibating or is that celebrating Robert Heinlein’s birthday as I colonise July in the Grapple Annual. Coming soon-ish.

The Grapple Annual No. 2

FEATURING:

Braille by Louis Klee (4 January)
Hydra by Emma Marie Jones (11 January)
– 28 January by Soraya Morayef (28 January)
– Loss by Alice Bishop (7 February)
– Racey Friends – looking by Paden Hunter (12 February)
– Nightdriving by Alexander Bennetts (28 February)
– Fairy Goddaughter by Sarah Pritchard (6 March)
– Beware the Ides of March! by Sam Brien (15 March)
 The Connected World by David C Mahler (21 March)
– Visiting Richard Yates by Elizabeth Caplice (25 March)
– March Camping, 1990s by Christopher Evans (26 March)
– Dreamcast Monolith with Undergrowth by Alice Carroll (31 March)
– Meander, Triste and Awe by Brett Canét-Gibson (14th April)
– Divine Vinyl by Owen Heitmann (16 April)
 From JG Ballard, July 1966 (behind Foot Locker, August 2013) by Andrew Galan (19 April)
– Today I Feel Like Remembering by Anna Jacobson (22 April)
 Thoughts on art and the ways it reaches you by Sandra Hajda (29 April)
– May, The Opening by Ben Walter (1 May)
– Mahala by Fikret Pajalic (5 May)
– The Drunk and the Flower Man by Nathan Fioritti (11 May)
– What If? by Miranda Cashin (15 May)
– The River Fisher’s Daughter by Kirk Marshall (25 May)
– Baby Emma by Emma Makepeace (1 June)
– All these places have their moments by Madeline Karurtz (12 June)
– After Life by Lauren Briggs (23 June)
The Golden Age of Science Fiction by David Stevens (7 July)
– The 8th July in History by Safdar Ahmed (8 July)
– Positive Space by Lynley Eavis (21 July)
– The End of Days by Jack Martinez (1 August)
– When They Were Young by Shuang West (13 August)
– Audley by Humyara Mahbub (14 August)
– The Gurindji People by Mandy Ord (16 August)
– Go Troppo by Isabelle Li (17 September)
– Campo de’ Fiori by Ashley Capes (22 September)
 Rule Ten by Gregory Wolos (28 September)
– Four Confessions That I’ve Been Meaning to Confess Since That Evening When We Made Guacamole and I Compared All Three Avocados to my Womb, Which Might’ve Made You Uncomfortable but I Couldn’t Tell for Sure by Kayla Pongrac (29 September)
– Pilot Episode, October 2nd by Lauren Paredes (2 October)
– I Desire; I Have Our Home by Emma Rose Smith (2 November)
– Great Emu War by Eleri Mai Harris (8 November)
– Lucia by Lucy Hunter (13 December)
– An ordinary domestic pattern was disclosed by Monica Carroll (17 December)
– Time Zones by Jake Lawrence (30 December)

Editor: Duncan Felton

Designer and visual art editor: Finbah Neill

Editorial Assistant: Rachael Nielsen

Readers: Lucy Nelson, Frazer Brown and  Kara Griffin-Warwicke

 

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At the Edge

In Uncategorized on September 14, 2015 at 12:46 pm

I am very happy to have a short story of mine included in the upcoming anthology, “At the Edge“, from Paper Road Press.

Sergeant Burns

In Uncategorized on July 17, 2015 at 1:58 am

Sergeant Burns’ penultimate report (yes, there is a link there) ended up in last year’s Grapple Annual. I’m hoping he has a few more adventures left in him.

Speculative Fiction Festival

In Uncategorized on June 28, 2015 at 10:30 am

A little shout out for the NSW Writers’ Centre’s Speculative Fiction Festival (click on the highlighted text to be taken straight to their webpage), being held a the centre in the beautiful grounds of the former mental asylum at Callan Park. I have previously enjoyed many speakers and panels at the Speculative Fiction Festival and also the Genre Fiction Festival, found new writers to read, and picked up on the buzz of being surrounded by so many people interested in writing, and even a few who make their living from it. If you are in Sydney on 18 July, I can recommend it.

This year’s convenor/director is Cat Sparks. At a panel a few years ago, she challenged the audience: are you actually finishing your stories? And then, are you submitting them? And are you aiming your sights high, are you trying to sell in foreign markets? I had to admit, with a couple of minor exceptions, that my answer to all three was ‘no’. And so I did something about it. I set targets. I finished work. I sent it out. I haven’t set any worlds on fire, but I’ve now made pro and semi-pro sales in Australia and overseas, of stories I am proud of, in  publications I am excited to be associated with. So: thank you, Cat Sparks!

Grappling with the time available …

In Uncategorized on October 18, 2014 at 7:37 am

Duncan Felton is going to run out of time. He has, with designer Finbah Neill,  created/edited/assembled/published a calendar based anthology, The Grapple Annual from scratch, carving the parts, bolting them together, and all I can say is, hats off to him. Who does that? Each entry is related to a different day of the year. I’m worried he will run out of days – the first volume of the annual covers more than a month. Perhaps he will move on to non-Terran years: Neptune (previously the penultimate planet) has shorter days and a much longer year than the earth. Or perhaps a Mayan calendar. I digress (how unusual).

They have put together works from 34 bright shiny writers and 5 bright shiny artists, as well as something by neither bright nor shiny me. The volume is a lovely looking artefact, and one of the nice things about a physical object is that you can pick it up and turn it over and see your name on the back cover (my priorities remain unchanged).

This is something I could never make or do, and I am happy to be a small part of it. If you are so minded, I encourage you to support the first volume of the Grapple Annual, with a view to it expanding far beyond Earth years.

Click here for a link to where you can purchase the first Grapple Annual.

Click here for a link to Grapple Publishing.

Click here to see the little list of my published stories.

Aurealis

In Uncategorized on December 3, 2013 at 9:52 am

Aurealis has been promoting Australian speculative fiction and supporting Australian writers since 1990. Their latest endeavour is to seek to become a Science Fiction Writers of America qualifying market, one of the prerequisites for which is to pay writers 5 cents a word (soon to be 6 cents) for stories published in their magazine. In order to do this, they require 1000 subscribers. They made the half way mark in 2013, and they are aiming to make it all the way in 2014.
A subscription is $20 Australian per year, which is less than $20 USD, which comes to two bucks an issue, received electronically. If you are interested in science fiction, fantasy, horror, or Australian writing, you might like to have a look here and consider subscribing for yourself, or as a reasonably priced Christmas present for a SF reader in your life. (I’ve put my money where my mouth is, I have subscribed again.)